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Treatment to Delay Labor Decreases Preterm Infant Risk for Cerebral Palsy

The New England Journal of Medicine is reporting in its August 28, 2008 edition that a study done by the National Institutes of Health reveals that preterm infants whose mothers had an administration of magnesium sulfate, a common treatment to delay preterm labor, are less likely to develop cerebral palsy.

The children who developed cerebral palsy and whose mother who recieved magnesium sulfate was 1.9% while the percentage of children who developed cerebral palsy and whose mother did not recieve the magnisium sulfate was 3.5%.  This finding may be very significant in reducing the number of children who develop cerebral palsy in light of the fact that approximately 33% of all children with cerbral palsy were born premature.  

Many children born with cerebral palsy require life long care that is often very expensive and difficult for parents to provide especially as their child becomes older. Because of this fact the medical community needs to take every action to reduce the number of children who develop cerebral palsy.  Hopefully, the results of this study will lead to a decrease in the number of children who develop cerebral palsy. 

If you have a child with cerebral palsy and you have any questions regarding whether or not your child's cerebral palsy could have been prevented email us or call us at 412-471-4300. Our team of lawyers and doctors will obtain your child's medical records and have them reviewed by medical experts.  Our attorneys have years of experience representing families whose children developed cerebral palsy as a result the negligence of doctors and hospitals.  At Berger & Lagnese we specialize in medical malpractice cases and we have obtained money our clients needed to take care of their children with cerebral palsy.  We have helped families of children with cerebral palsy throughout Western Pennsylvania, including Indiana, Washington, Uniontown and Pittsburgh.